General Information


What is a Benelli Lift and how is it generally performed?

The Benelli lift was designed to lift smaller breasts in women with less obtrusive ptosis, better known as the loss of elasticity, through the removal of a doughnut-shaped piece of tissue around the areola.

Benelli mastopexy usually results in only a scar around the areola. In cases where the nipple must be moved a long distance, or when the skin has lost much of its elasticity, an additional vertical incision or crease incision will be made.  Over time the scars fade and flatten, causing no aesthetic issues for the patient.

This surgery is considered to be less invasive than other forms of breast lift alteration.  When the piece of tissue around the areola border is excised, the surrounding remaining tissue is carefully sutured to the areola. Those incisions are closed with purse string sutures and at times a little more tissue may be removed above the areola to allow for a lifting effect when it is sutured. This results in a flatter, rounder breast shape, with minimal scarring. The procedure is usually performed on an outpatient basis under local anesthesia with sedation.

What is recovery like and what risks may be involved?

Patients are able to return to work within one week and have reported that it may take up to one year for the full effect to be seen.

With all breast alteration surgery, there is a small risk of decreased sensation, slow healing, and loss of nipple/areolar tissue.  With aging and weight fluctuations, results over time may vary.  It is important for each patient to have a thorough discussion with a cosmetic surgeon to gain a clear understanding of all risks involved.

Disclaimer: This information is intended only as an introduction to this procedure. This information should not be used to determine whether you will have the procedure performed nor does it guarantee results of your elective surgery. Further details regarding surgical standards and procedures should be discussed with your physician.

By OnlineSurgery Staff
Updated: October 1, 2008

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